One of the most significant functions of mouthguards is to keep your teeth from breaking. If your tooth does fracture, it sometimes can be saved, but a proper mouthguard can help prevent breaks from happening in the first place.

Mouthguards also defend against tooth displacement.  For example, if a baseball hits you hard in the mouth, it may not break your teeth, but it can move them out of alignment. If you’re wearing a mouthguard, the blow is cushioned and the force is distributed more evenly, so one tooth doesn’t bear the brunt of the force.

Mouthguards help prevent teeth from being knocked out.  No one wants this, obviously, and mouthguards have kept many a tooth in their users’ mouths. Guards also defend against soft tissue wounds. It is not uncommon for athletes to bite through their bottom lips, requiring stitches.  Wearing a mouthguard can easily eliminate this type injury.  It can also prevent wounds to your tongue and cheeks.

Mouthguards might even defend against concussions. There’s some discussion on this issue. Those that say that mouthguards can help stop concussions suggest that the extra padding between the mandible and the maxilla could reduce the force of the mandible pushing up on the skull close to the brain, which could set off a concussion. Other brain surgeons aren’t so sure, since no direct studies have been done, but Dr. Cantu, an expert on concussions, notes that in any case, mouthguards “do forestall wounds to the teeth so I would suggest all collision-sports players wear mouth guards.”

Mouthguards can also defend against jaw splinters and jaw breaks. When you receive a blow to the head and your teeth contact one another, there’s not too much room for flexibility.  The mouthguard offers a layer of flexible plastic between the teeth and acts as padding to save the jaw from fracturing.  Jaw splinters frequently need major surgery, so the simple prevention of wearing a mouthguard may prevent major problems from an injury.

Most often, the reasons people give for not wearing a mouthguard are either related to the bother of wearing one (which is pretty minimal) or peer pressure to NOT wear one. But should an injury to your teeth happen, you’ll find the “bother and peer pressure” will be the least of your concerns.

We suggest you review this site for an athletic mouthguard:   http://www.shockdoctor.com/products/mouthguards.aspx

It’s a good, cost-effective option for costly custom made mouthguards.

 

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